Tag Archive: Intellipay

Pacific Webworks Goes Quietly

Pacific Webworks Sold

Oh how the mighty have fallen.

Pacific WebWorks Sale Approved

The U.S. Bankruptcy Court approved Pacific WebWorks motion authorizing the sale of Debtor’s intellipay subsidiary free and clear of liens, claims, encumbrances and interests.

The order states, “The Debtor conducted an auction consistent with the procedures described in the Motion on April 20, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. (the Auction). The highest and best bid submitted at the Auction was by Convenient Payments, in the amount of $140,000. The second highest and best bid submitted at the Auction was by Otterstrom in the amount of $130,000.”

Look what happens when fraudulent business practices are used and sound advice ignored.

http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=PWEB

PWW Share Price Feb 2016

PWW Share Price Feb 2016

Look at what once was…

PWW 5yr share history

PWW 5yr share history

Back in September 2009, Pacific Webworks was proudly announcing $21.4 million in gross profits.  Shares were over 30 cents.
http://www.pcworld.com/article/184003/article.html

Now the business is sold, share price less than a cent.

Karmic Retribution Ignored?

But PWW were warned, not least in these pages.

Along with Jesse Willms they ignored the dire warnings about improper business practices.  Willms even threatened me with his lawyers to shut up.

In the end, they were both just too bad, too visibly illegal, too hurtfully immoral in their ways that even the glacially slow process of real justice finally caught up with them – PWW couldn’t take the hit from a Google lawsuit, Willms couldn’t take the hit from the Feds, though he still continues in business without his old fanfares of self-publicity and his websites are notable for their lack of detail what he actually does anymore.

Related Posts:

Fabian Tactics of Google Work At Home Scam Legal Team

Pacific Webworks / Quad Try and Dodge the Issue

Oh What a Tangled Web We Weave...

Oh What a Tangled Web We Weave...

Back in 2009 I stumbled upon a negative option scam for which those involved were sued by Google (and folded with an out-of-court settlement) and were prosecuted by Uncle Sam, losing again.  Initially, I was completely unaware of the depths of deception to which these people would stoop, but then I rapidly discovered the nightmare web that they’d constructed and how difficult it was for ordinary people, duped by slick honest-looking promises, to un-pick themselves from it.

Not only that, I quickly realised that PWW weren’t the only spawn of the devil and that others, like Jesse Willms, were up to very similar tricks.  See:

Methods

The above list of links more-or-less shows how we found out the Pacific Webworks (PWW) story.  They’re by no means the only set of devils in the world trying to scam people, but they’re the one’s I stumbled upon first.  That’s all.

Their business was to set up website templates that their “customers” could use to extract money from their customers by use of the negative option scam.  In effect, they were selling the tools to steal to people, who then had the option of calling it a day or selling the tools to steal on themselves, thus stealing.

To promote it they used mass advertising through paid ads on Google (using the Google and others’ trademarks to make it appear that these offers were endorsed by those referenced), through Quad, which they owned, and fake news or personal information websites (flogs) loaded with follow up ads.  The promotions could be their own, but for the most part it was all done by “affiliates” (their customers) that all took varying degrees of commission for follow-through clicks.

The advertising was managed by Bloosky Interactive that also operated through 3rd parties unsolicited email adverts, spam to you and me.

Underlying it all was the credit card processing business which they also owned (Intellipay) usually through the securecart domain.

All parties involved, except the final folk who didn’t really understand how bent this whole operation was, fully understood the nature of this business.  How could they not? – when they were selling “services” for $1.95 for which they’d get $30 commission!!!

Turn of the Screw

In another twist of deviousness, PWW (run by Bell, Bell, Larsen & Larsen at the time) set up The Quad Group (geddit?) to avoid creditors.  This is how they themselves described it:

In June 2009 we experienced limited merchant account processing capabilities which created a situation where we could not satisfy payables to marketing partners. To generate needed cash in the 2009 second quarter we sold a portion of our hosting portfolio that was in excess of merchant account limitations to The Quad Group, LLC, a related party (the “Quad Group”) for $157,786. Quad Group is owned and managed by current directors, officers and an employee of Pacific WebWorks. We may periodically be required to enter into sale transactions with Quad Group to properly manage our merchant account processing requirements.

Neat huh?

Cuts and Thrusts

So that’s about it, as I currently understand it.  PWW’s managers/owners had customers on two levels, that is;

  1. The direct affiliates and associated advertisers who were enticed into the operation or migrated from other similar schemes via the lure of easy money.  These people used the templates to lure others with promises of easy money, paid as commission for attracting others to run the same schemes.  The schemes didn’t sell anything – except the scheme!  A true pyramid scam!
  2. Duped suckers.  These, numerically the vast majority, soon realised after one or two mysterious withdrawals from their account of amounts around the $79 mark, that it was a scam.

The thrust of the plan was the hope that most people wouldn’t do anything, wouldn’t investigate much and wouldn’t associate with other suckers through embarrassment or whatever, just writing off the episode as one of life’s bad judgements.  Thus PWW would make say, $200 from which all the ads and affiliates would get their cut.

Just Desserts

Statue of Justice

Statue of Justice

Unfortunately for PWW, it didn’t work out quite like that.  Sure they made pots of money for a few years, but they upset too many people and eventually, through the power of communication via the very internet which was their arena,  news of what they were doing became so much that first Google, then Uncle Sam had to act.

Black September

But still the shit kept coming their way.  Just as I’d predicted in my postings (see list above), karma would get them.  On 19 September 2011 this year a class action was brought against the three main bodies behind the scam – Booth Ford v PWW et al – Barbara Ford is to be commended for her patience.  It was 2009 when she first filed for a class action!

In it, we see just how badly PWW have been acting for years.  Section 11, for me, sums it up perfectly!

Booth Ford v PWW et al Section 11

Booth Ford v PWW et al Section 11

So there we have it!  Now where’s the problem?

Rip-off Too Big!!

On 1 December 2011, Quad (who are actually essentially the same people as PWW with an almost similar board make-up – in fact the Google settlement made it plain that wives of the directors had been roped in as well), filed to be removed from the Class Action because they might have ripped off too much from people!  eh??  See QUAD_GROUP_NOTICE_OF_REMOVAL

The essence of their legal Fabian tactic (as I see it) is that:

  1. They scammed people from all over, not just Illinois, so it’s not a valid class action.
  2. They scammed people so much (by over $5m they say), that it’s the wrong court in which they should be tried, so ditch your claim against us!
  3. They scammed people by so much that the class action lawyer’s fees alone will be $9m so same reasoning as point 2!
Quad Group Sums

Quad Group Sums

Their sums in the above court removal document are in this screenshot.  There are others as well.  Of course, Quad (PWW with a different hat on remember) aren’t admitting any liability at all with this, so my use of the words scamming bastards reflects my personal opinions, not a statement of fact.  These opinions are based on the facts that:

  1. Pacific Webworks acquiesced to all of Google’s demands when sued for illegal trademark usage.
  2. Eborn and others lost their case when sued by the Texas AG when using PWW’s templates*, finance processing and networks to scam folks for millions of dollars.
  3. PWW lost their case when sued by Uncle Sam.
  4. PWW admitted filing untrue SEC accounts and changed accountants twice because of this.
  5. One of the accountants was directly related to a PWW director.

It’s noteworthy that the sum of $43m is derived from one “illegal” charge of ~$80 plus one subsequent charge of ~$25 multiplied across the claimed customer count of ~455,000 persons – because I have evidence from people who’ve contacted this site and others that some people had up to half a dozen illegal account withdrawals before they could put on a stop, which implies that the allegedly scammed amount could be much, much higher.

It’s also noteworthy that Quad’s own suppositional sums show high value amounts from this “business” yet for all this time, no dividends were paid and the only way investors in the company could make money was through share price changes.  If you tie this information to the incorrect accounting and familial accountant/director relationships, plus the fact that PWW is largely the same people as Quad, then collusion looks highly likely over this time period and the SEC will quite possibly be knocking following the conclusion to this class action.

With regard to the SEC, the same SEC filing that revealed Quad’s dubious formation also reveals that;

Our client base includes approximately 30,000 active customer accounts. We rely on the efforts of our internal marketing staff and on third party resellers, including our wholly-owned reseller, TradeWorks Marketing, to add accounts to our customer base. – see SEC Link

Well they can’t both be right, can they, Quad?  Is it 455,892 customers in your sums or is it 30,000 in the SEC filing?

Linkages

Copious links are included in the articles referenced by the site references at the beginning of this article so I haven’t had time to re-reference all the above statements.  But they’re there should you wish to look.

I certainly hope that the Fabian tactics don’t work and that people see them for what they are.

Notes & Addendum

*     Eborn et al used website designs very similar to those provided by PWW.   Whether they were exactly the same is a moot point in my view, because like a burglar who learns to house-break from another burglar, the crow-bar used will not be exactly the same crow bar, but it’s the idea of using a crowbar that’s important to the final act of theft.  In other words templates, like crowbars, are just tools.  Eborn’s websites were almost carbon-copies of those from PWW using all the Visual “tools”, the money processing and the affiliate networks that they “employed”.   Many sites (I had a huge list of them and copied images directly from the site before they locked it down) were partly or wholly hosted on pantherssl.com  via Bloosky.  These co-incidences didn’t happen by chance and show intelligent design behind their purpose.  (Thanks Paul!)

Related Posts:

My First BRITISH Google Business Kit

In this post Dangerous EffectiveCleanse – and Scams Too! two weeks ago, I mentioned how a scumbag webhost called byet.org is redirecting a client’s Amazon Shop clicks to that other pustule of conmanship called MyBookFace.net

Checks

MyBookFace Homepage Screendump

MyBookFace Homepage Screendump

Well I’ve just checked and it’s still on. (Someone wants to get that fixed!)  At the bottom of the MyBookFace landing page was an yet another advert for home working.  It’s the red one at the bottom and unusually, it’s BRITISH!

“Aye up!”, I thought.  “What’s going on here?”

Make Money Using Google!

What is going on is exactly the same rubbish that we’ve seen countless times from the rich jokers at Pacific Webworks (PWW).

Internet Success - Emily Rosher

Internet Success - Emily Rosher

This time, you’ll find the nice young family of “Emily Rosher”.  The website is at,

http://www.bizsuccessblogs.com/emilyrosher/blog/  (this company is hidden by a domain privacy outfit in Toronto)

As we know from our Google Treasure Chest, Google Money Kit, Google Revolution and other experiences, this isn’t real.  Check out the screendump.  See the smiling honest faces.  See the cheque with the same fingers as last year.  See the false comments and how they’ve stopped due to “spam” and “distasteful contents”…

Helpfully, if you check out at the very bottom of the screendump they tell it’s all false. (You’ll have to click the little green arrow to expand the picture size once it’s loaded to be able to see this)

But the $1.97 shipping fee is now a £1.23 fee.  Nowhere on “Emily’s” blog does it mention any monthly charges, but, y’know, you can still do all the bollocks of trying to cancel and still watch as requests for refunds are handled with disdain even though you think you’re within the time limit.

Q. How do I know this?

A. Because that’s what they do and that’s what they’ve always done.  A leopard can’t change it’s spots.  We have almost countless complaints against these charlatans.

Emily’s Saviour?

“Emily” bases all her success on one product.  It’s got a new name, and looks slightly different to Google Treasure Chest.  It’s called;

Home Business Kit Using Google

You’ll find it here if you follow “Emily’s” link,

https://secure1.s3curehost.com/gophuk/?offer=go_pw_cmv8&cm=514785&id1=894177674&id2=[OPTINFO]&session-id=06281e5f7f823c0036c28274637e9abc#

It just trips off the tongue for a catchy web address, doesn’t it?

A leopard, waiting to pounce on the Unwary?

A leopard, waiting to pounce on the Unwary?

A simple WHOIS on s3curehost.com shows it all run by Intellipay a.k.a Pacific Webworks in Salt Lake City, Utah  (see my other postings for their details).

Page Details

Make Money Using Google!

Make Money Using Google!

But check out the layout!  Handily it’s got a nice Union Flag in case you’re confused.  It also says

Emily's T&Cs

Emily's T&Cs

“As seen on BBC, Economist, Guardian” – but then says at the bottom that it has nothing to do with Google?  Curious…

Let’s go back to Emily’s website.  Check out her Terms & Conditions.  She says,  “This website is not associated with ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, or USA Today.” Er…where did they come from?

Source of “As Seen On…” Statements

Now despite the Google Kit being bollocks, there’s an interesting link in Emily’s T&C page (check the screen-dump).  In a nutshell, this claims that ALL the references ever made about “Stores Seen on ABC, AOL, Global, CNN and CNBC” emanate from this single New York Times post from 2006!

It’s called, Google’s Shadow Payroll Is Not Such a Secret Anymore.  It’s a reasonable enough piece, but one thing it’s distinctly lacking in, is the phrase “Stores Seen on ABC, AOL, Global, CNN and CNBC” or anything remotely similar to it or the various companies listed!

WTF!

Conclusion – or should that be Con, Clue? Shun!

One thing lacking from the “British” google thing is any mention of County Durham – in Britain!  The Philippines & Cyprus, Gibraltar & Nevis are also lacking.  Previously, in the Google Treasure Chest scam, these places popped up all the time.  Myself, @Not Kevin and others have spent many an hour chasing these things down.

PWW is certainly responding to the hits it’s getting both legal from the courts and verbal from all the various websites devoted to pulling apart their shady dealings.

The T&Cs make this clear in the “British” Google thing.  Specific mention is made that forces the “customer” not to start any chargeback proceedings no matter what the cause…. (..er  What about UK distance-selling regulations? Isn’t this a “British” site?  Ha Ha.  Don’t you believe it.)

This PROVES that chargebacks work and is the thing that PWW are most afraid of.  Here’s two bits from the T&Cs that prove this:

1.2 You unconditionally and expressly agree and accept the Conditions set forth herein  as a binding contract (“the Agreement”) enforceable by law.

AND

4.1 You agree that any disputed fee will not be charged back to Your credit card issuer. You expressly agree to submit in writing any objection regarding fees to 230 West 400 South, Suite 100 SLC UT, 84101
4.2 PCO, in its sole discretion, shall determine the validity of Your objection and notify You of its decision. Should You disagree with PCO decision, You agree to mediate the dispute before litigation.
4.3 You agree to indemnify PCO or associated product owners or resellers for any financial harm or any losses caused by Your objections to fees that do not comply with this Agreement. You will be held responsible for the reimbursement of any fees and losses incurred as a result of Your failure to comply with any provision in this Agreement.

Q.E.D.

They’re just putting the frighteners on.   PCO, by the way, stands for http://www.profitcenteronline.com, Profit Center Online.  It’s really PWW and is in Utah at the same PWW address.

Related Posts:

More on Google Profits and Pacific Webworks

What a tangled web we weave...

Oh What a tangled web we weave…

Oh What a tangled web we weave…

Back on May 1st I checked out this particular morph of the Google Money Bollox Kit Chest Scheme Plan…  See here.  I just had to show it because of the naff spelling and wordage, plus the inconsistencies in the text and graphics, and company name changes.

Normal

Of course, I’ve now realised that this is all totally normal and is done on purpose to keep Propellor heads busy..  At the time, the penultimate link in the chain of signing up, was:

Propellor Head

So I thought I’d check if it still worked, it being a “secure” connection with session ID, and myself having been through several incarnations of Firefox as well as frequent cache and cookie clearances….

Copyright © 2009 Google Profits™

Well I was still laughing at the dinky trademark sign when I fired up (in)s3curehost dot com.  They obviously consider it something worth protecting!

Work from home with google

Work from home with google

You’ll not be surprised to know that s3curehost.com still exists (so much for security and session IDs?).  I’m actually surprised, in a small way, that they still keep pumping this stuff out. A Whois shows that  s3curehost.com is “IntelliPay, Inc.” a.k.a. “Pacific WebWorks, Inc.” who we’ve already looked at in Salt Lake City on the original Google Treasure Chest – It’s a Scam and a Half posting.

The “Google Profits” web-page has changed slightly, but the incompetent spelling and characteristic inconsistency is reassuringly still there!

It’s to good…  Earn $978 a day… Google Profits – eAuction, which one is it?

I left my “qualifying” to another day, so I haven’t found out if I’m ‘eligable’ yet.

Pacific Web Works

Pacific WebWorks, Inc.

Pacific WebWorks, Inc.

There are two things of note about this business, apart from the “Microsoft Certified Partner” logo. [added 26/10/2009: Matt at scamtimes.com has checked out the claim to be valid here in this comment below. However, it seems very easy to get this ‘logo’ certification.]

  1. The phone number at the contact page here: http://web.archive.org/web/20100507231016/http://www.pacificwebworks.com:80/contact_pweb.htm, which is:
    230 West 400 South 1st Floor
    Salt Lake City, UT 84101

    phone: 801-578-9020
    fax: 801-578-9019
  2. It’s business is an integrated solution for other internet based businesses – my description(SP).

At first glance it’s a normal business for this line of work.  Here’s what they say about themselves and their custom  software suite:

  • They have “assembled a staff of professional trainers, coaches and support specialists”
  • They have “built a state-of-the-art data center” which takes “care of everything, including hosting, manpower, and technical details”
  • They provide “Tools for creating, managing and maintaining a web site”.
  • They provide “Electronic business tools, including storefront hosting, shopping cart and Internet payment systems.”.
  • They provide “Internet Marketing tools, including automated customer database, survey, and e-mail marketing tools.”.
The Plot Thickens

The Plot Thickens

So far so good.  And the database – that must be where all the contacts are kept, securely, private?

Now check that telephone number again.  It was the 9020 that did it! Like primeval intelligence, it’s come back from the depths of my mind.

It’s listed as the main contact point for Google Treasure Chest, etc, many times.  See here and here for two of my posts.  Now check this google search for the phone number 801-578-9020.

There are 1780 results, nearly all are complaints about being ripped-off or scammed.

Another word for rip-off or scam is the legal term, theft.

Conclusion

Chain link

Like links in a chain

Pacific Webworks are still in business – in fact, business is booming and they are reported to be in the top 40 Utah companies!  (http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/pacific-webworks-receives-recognition,890942.shtml).  I’m not sure who this lot are doing the reporting, but I can guess the connections…(added 3/3/10: Link to Earth Times removed.  This ‘business’ contains several puffs for PWW.  Like most dodgy websites, it’s domain WHOIS is hidden, by Domains by Proxy, again! – SP)

What a tangled web we weave...

What a tangled web we weave…

This industrial resource, http://resources.bnet.com/topic/pacific+webworks+inc..html, shows that the company had sales >$9m last year for its 34 employees. This is very interesting!  The same source shows, on this page, that profits are doubling at the company this year.

This is good news for all the people ripped off by Eborn et al.

Because the company, having exactly the same phone number as the main protagonists in the Google Treasure Chest scams, now cannot fail to be connected by the FTC in their investigations and imminent court cases.

And from what I recall from the closure of the call centre, is that 200 employees lost their jobs.  This is the same call centre that had 801-578-9020 as the contact number!  It was people working at the call centre who said that 200 people worked there(see http://www.topix.net/forum/source/fox13now/T28A5BU37IS57DC8C/p3).

 

Weakest Link

So there isn’t just a partial business relationship between Pacific Webworks and one or more plaintiffs mentioned in the FTC charges, they are intimately connected.

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