Program problems

 Posted by on March 19, 2008  Add comments
Mar 192008
 

Last updated on December 1st, 2010

Hi Paul

Ableton’s running now in user mode as I explained below! You did send the right one, it just didn’t carry across registration between Admin mode and user mode. I used the registry cleaner before I did anything to get rid of the old installations I had. I’ve installed a few things and they all work except one, the Melodyne main prog. I can’t get it unlocked. Plugin yes, main no.
I’ve also twiddled with the moog things. They’re really fun! What with the fat sounds and dangly wires…

  7 Responses to “Program problems”

  1. Yeah cool, you mentioned that Fat32 trick before but I forgot about it
    I will have to remember it this time
    Thanks
    paul

  2. Hi dude.

    • NTFS is more robust, more secure, and uses large discs more efficiently. WinXP-sp1 will only use the first 137Gb of a hard disc. SP2 goes up to Tb levels.
    • With NTFS you have full security privileges and lock-downs available to different users – hence administrators, power users, users, guests.
    • FAT (16 or 32) has very simple protections and anyone on a PC can look at anyone else’s files.
    • The default for XPHome was FAT. You had to download the NTFS converter and convert to NTFS afterwards at the command prompt. This is the bad way to do it as it makes the disc a lot slower. Ideally, you should install straight to a NTFS partition.
    • Personally, I use the hard drive manufacturers utility to format the drive and then install windows on that. It’s faster. The windows format-install procedure is very slow…
    • If you know the administrator account name and password, you can access a NTFS partition from another machine (or the same machine) by running Linux! This means that NTFS security is fallible and hence the need for firewalls and stuff. You can get Linux boot discs that enable you to reset the admin password to get full access. I’ve done it at work and at home! Only by encrypting files makes them more secure.
    • However, NTFS allows you to run programs with different permissions levels, so I try and run with the minimum.
    • One failing in the security of NTFS c.f. FAT, is that NTFS takes “streams” of hidden data in a file. This can hide malware. FAT doesn’t take streams so can’t hide the malware in this way. In fact, I thought I had some dodgy stuff once, so to make sure it went, I copied all the user data (my docs etc) to a FAT32 drive (it took ages), wiped the windows drive and did a re-install, then copied all the docs etc from the FAT32 drive onto the new NTFS windows setup. I’ve done it between pc’s as well over the network. It’s a useful trick – at least to stop infiltrations of the new rootkit viruses floating about. Try it on a folder: copy to FAT, delete folder, copy back to NTFS. Rootkits gone! I make a batch file using xcopy and delete commands and then set it off…

    Strangely Perfect

  3. Right now Im running XP home on Laptop and home computer on XP pro both with NTFS
    The Laptop is still SP1 but the home is SP2
    They say that Fat32 is more secure security wise, but all music sites recommend NTFS
    Im gonna do a dual boot for my laptop with 1 OS for internet, video and design stuff and 2 OS just for music
    Hope this helps
    Paul

  4. I’m not running it as admin. I said it only ran in full mode as a admin but in demo mode as a user when it was first installed. Now I’ve got it to run in full mode as a user as I was trying to explain.

    Do you run XPPro or XPHome? And if you run XPPro do use format your file system as ntfs or fat32? That’s what it was all about, I think; a windows permissions thing.

  5. Why are you running it in admin mode?

  6. Nothings wrong now. I just thought you’d like to know what happens when you don’t run in admin mode.

  7. I’m running that version right now. So what seems to be the problem?
    Paul

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