Asperatus Clouds are Great!

 Posted by on June 1, 2009  Add comments
Jun 012009
 

Last updated on November 20th, 2015

Aren’t These THE Most Fantastic Pictures?

Asperatus Clouds

Asperatus Clouds

Asperatus Clouds

Asperatus Clouds

The BBC has picked up today (why today? I dunno!) on some photos from the Cloud Appreciation Society.  They are suggesting a new class of cloud to be called Asperatus, on top of the Cumulus, Cirrus etc that we already have.

Might I suggest ‘Fantasticus’ as these are some of THE eeriest pictures I’ve ever seen.  Thank god for modern, fast, portable cameras!

It’s like natural art.

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  2 Responses to “Asperatus Clouds are Great!”

  1. ohhh….for sure, asperatus clouds are great…..you mean HAARP clouds?
    you think it’s great that our leaders are dumping chem trails over us in the sky?
    poisoning us with harmful chemicals that they drop from planes to interrupt natural weather patterns?
    you think it’s great that they cover up their senseless, cold blooded acts with little fluffy good meaning terms like “asperatus clouds?”
    we’re not little kids who can believe this and believe me, they’re not getting away with this, these pigs are going to get what they’re giving three fold, and I’m going to laugh when it’s going down

    • Ok Dave.  Good for you.

      I’d never heard of HAARP clouds so I did a search.  Most of the image returns were of contrails – claimed to be “chemtrails” with certain long-lived and/or rainbow effects.

      These I’ve seen for years, of course.  The rainbow effect being noted for millenia (as in the phrase “blue moon” and  the halos that I’ve seen round the moon, and the optical triple sun effect which I’ve seen several times in my life.

      These I saw well before any HAARP array construction started in Alaska.

      Long-life contrails were observed by millions of Londoners during the “Battle of Britain”.  In those warm August days many noted that the contrails left by the dogfights lasted for many hours afterwards.  This was 1940.  This means that long-life contrails are an existing phenomena and depend on the relative humidity of the contrail environment.

      As for the “asperatus clouds”, it’s a good enough name for weird clouds.  I’ve seen many weird clouds over the years, the UK being located just under the whiplash tail of the main northern hemisphere jetstream.

      I’ve seen lenticular clouds over our hills and mountains that hover for hours (stationary wave effect).

      I’ve seen breast shaped clouds under thunderstorms.

      I’ve read a book at night under the continuous illumination of sheet lightning that lasted for hours.

      I’ve seen “holes” in the clouds over the North Sea.  This I attributed to radiative effects of warm water or possible seeding from an algal or plankton swarm.

      I’ve seen meteors land in Northumberland.

      My grandfather saw ball lightning (a thunderball) in Wales as a child.

      All of the above happened before HAARP was constructed.

      I’ve seen tornadoes over Somerset, although this was only a few years ago but nevertheless the Bristol Channel is historically famous for them, and waterspouts.

      I also see a huge number of contrails in the morning.  This is because the planes are all aiming to get to Heathrow etc for the early morning landing spots because overnight landings aren’t allowed. They fly over my head and I see nothing unusual in it.

      You however, in Canada (if your IP address isn’t cloaked), are much closer to the HAARP action so may be more aware of more specific things.  Maybe also you see aurorae more frequently than myself being closer to the magnetic pole than I.  I can’t say for sure.  I don’t blame my coughs on chemtrails though.

      What I can say is:

      • that virtually all HAARP and the totally different “chemtrail” evidence is flimsy and has been personally observed by me well before any of the work started.
      • I’ve not noticed any “extra” phenomena over my lifetime apart from a general warming of our British weather.  It seems sunnier now, with denser clouds when it’s cloudy and colder winters when it decides to be cold.  The winds seem windier when very windy, but not by much.  These are global warming effects, which are more pronounced when looking at things like egrets and other birds, various bees and beetles plus several plants species that are now permanent to Britain whereas they were visitors only when I was a child.  I don’t think ELF radio is doing it as it all started well before the project.
      • I used to live in mid-Wales near a now dismantled ELF transmitter that was used to talk to nuclear subs in the Cold War.  It was at Criggion.  I didn’t notice any effect on the local population (jokes aside) while it was working, (or myself as I used to climb up the mountain to check out the wire mounting points near the quarry) or since it’s been closed in my subsequent visits to old friends…
      • I know that the camera lies and those with more axe to gring will doctor their photos to suit their own ends.  It’s soooooo easy in this digital age.

      It’s a question of belief, I suppose.  I just try and establish what my eyes have told me using my experience and education.  I’m extremely cynical about the motives of the elite, but obfuscation works in many ways and having a wacky distraction is a good way to deflect the masses from the real problems and issues of the day.  Fifth columnists and agent provocateurs are nothing new.

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