Jul 172008
 

Last updated on February 18th, 2017

In a burst of comparative forgetfulness not seen since “Tim Nice but Dim” appeared on the telly, Britain’s “The Sun” “news”-paper has called some twit Yorkshire boy called Andrew Kellett;

UK’s dumbest criminal

In a nipple-free article notable for the absence of the usual crap puns and commentary, the headline and a small amount of comment sardonically said that he did lot’s of crimes and then put them on the web for everyone to see.  And then called him dumb for doing so and getting caught.  They’ve even got a “Have Your Say” bit to allow people to hop in and poke a pillory’s worth of fun at the twit.

[Sun article now dumped – Waily Fail article reports the same here – 4 years later the Scum is reporting a similar story but Facebook related….  SP, 18/2/2017]

This is the same paper that quite happily publishes lies and innuendo and harasses people to distraction and stupidly puts all the results of this in it’s pages for profitAll of these are “crimes” that The Sun has committed and for which it has then been successfully sued and(or) prosecuted.  News of The World, another bit of Murdoch’s stuff is the same.  [LATEST:  example from today is here, Court ‘vindicates’ McCann suspect]

Now let’s rephrase the headline;

UK’s dumbest newspaper

Ho Ho

Fortunately for The Sun, people keep buying it for other reasons, not the accuracy or impartiality of it’s reporting and certainly not for the latest “news”…  This, along with the other cash-flows from adverts, means it can afford to publish all manner of crap secure in the knowledge that most people can’t afford to sue it directly.  It knows that censure from the Press Complaints Commission etc is like a tut in a crossword…

In effect, it’s customers are subsidising it’s court costs because of the titillation it provides them at other people’s expense.

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