Roger Irrelevant, Data Security, Liam Byrne and Johnny Foreigner

Roger Irrelevant, Data Security, Liam Byrne and Johnny Foreigner

July 18, 2008 Freedom 1
Liam Byrne

Liam Byrne

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Roger Irrelevant

Two items this week have prompted this post which follows on from others like Laughable Big Brother. The Viz character, Roger Irrelevant is the link. (Viz flash version of a Roger Irrelevant cartoon.)

Quoting from the Wikipedia description of Roger:

“Roger Irrelevant is utterly detached from reality. The premise of the strip is that he spends his entire time making irrelevant remarks and suffering from bizarre delusions, usually involving inanimate objects. Roger does not have much of a personality and is oblivious to nearly everything around him.”

Three quizzed in migration probe

The BBC investigates illegal immigrants then the cops wade in….  There are bucket loads of forged papers on sale to anyone who wants them….

Border and Immigration Minister Liam Byrne said:

“This is fresh evidence for why ID cards are needed so urgently (my stress) and why it is so misguided to propose shutting our new system down.(…) businesses need to know who is legitimately here and that is why cards are so important.

MoD admits loss of secret files

The MOD has lost 658 laptop computers and 131 USB flash drives.

This is one of many government data losses.  Some of this stuff is top secret – apparently – whatever that’s supposed to mean nowadays.  So I repeat what Liam Byrne said just in case you missed it:

“This is fresh evidence for why ID cards are needed so urgently (my stress) and why it is so misguided to propose shutting our new system down.(…) businesses need to know who is legitimately here and that is why cards are so important.

Let’s find why Liam Byrne keeps repeating this bollox!

The minister had an ordinary education and did Politics & Modern History at university.  He then got a prestigious grant to get a MBA from HarvardSo being good at Politics, History and Business Administration immediately qualifies him to be an expert on computing systems and security?  Would you feel qualified?

Byrne co-started up a company called E-Government Solutions Ltd which does what it says on the tin.  It seeks to get all things IT into the government machine. This was before Byrne entered parliament, but as soon as he became an MP he had an unusually fast promotion according to Wikipedia.  Nothing wrong there except for his pronouncements from on high.  Previous to his recent promo for ID Cards, (which with the current idiots in charge will in the end probably give to a company seeking to get all things IT into the government machine), he’s made such pronouncements as;

This is how the minister’s pronouncements and actions have reminded me of Roger Irrelevant. Unfortunately, Labour dot gov have seen fit for him to be in charge of ID Cards and Immigration.

He thinks ID Cards will control criminals – er, no they won’t. Criminals have a behaviour that’s in their name – they’re criminals for fuck’s sake.

If all they have to do to forge a document is stick a fingerprint on it, then that’s what they’ll do.  They’ve already forged the document with a stolen name! If all they need is a few more IDs, they’ll just go to a website or a roundabout or maybe the back of a government taxi to find some our details there – the government has proved at all levels that it is singularly incapable of safeguarding ours or anyone elses info!

Apart from MPs own addresses that is!  What’s that?

Yes it’s true.  Our elected representatives are now on the need to know list, as the headline shows;

MPs’ addresses to remain secret.

Somehow they’ve conveniently forgotten that when you register as a candidate, your address, your nominee and your seconder are all there in the public domain.  This is part of the democratic system that’s called “free and fair” elections with accountability at all levels to ensure this is so.

Unless they’ve removed all of that?  I don’t know.  I may as well give up and go to Zimbabwe.

 

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