Jul 302008
 

Last updated on October 14th, 2010

In my capacity at work, if I steal something from a member of the public while they are on site, I’d get interviewed by the police and prosecuted under the law of the land.

Bizarrely, in TV land they don’t work to our laws.  If they steal from the public, the company gets fined by a “Watchdog”!!!

BBC fined £400,000 over phone-ins is the latest abomination of justice.  Here’s the sequence of events:

  • BBC boss says “make a show”
  • BBC boss says “Make more money”
  • BBC staff say “How?”
  • BBC boss says “Charge people for phone calls even if competitions are finished or there isn’t one or if the winner is pre-determined!”
  • BBC staff say “OK”
  • Someone finds out
  • BBC say sorry, whatever that means.  How can an organisation say sorry!
  • Not good enough, says the Watchdog.  We’ll have £400,000.  (How do they choose this figure and how can one publicly funded body fine another?)

Conclusion

  • So the BBC is funded by the licence payer
  • So in effect, we pay the fine ourselves (it’s about 3p each)
  • The BBC boss keeps making shows and promises to be good.

Recommendation

No.  No.  No.

The boss ordered a THEFT, just like an East End gang boss.  They stole millions, just like an East End Gang boss.

The BBC (and ITV) boss for each show that instigated the theft should be prosecuted under common law. They gained (or intended to gain) from their actions.  Presumably making profits is high up on the CV criteria and they’d be looking for bonuses and promotions and/or new contracts.  So they gained in quite material ways.

Prosecute individuals. It’s the only way to make corporations act ethically.  The fact that BBC bosses took a bonus cut (!) is immaterial.  They should be prosecuted for theft and have a big chunk taken from their salary not a piddling cut in bonus.

The whole thing stinks and the disparate way that the law is applied in this country is a disgrace to honour.  Shame on the whole fucking lot of them.

Prosecute the Watchdog for incompetence.  If a farmer has a guard dog that doesn’t do it’s job, it’s put down because it’s plainly useless.  Same with OfCom.  This “affair” went on for two years.  What are they playing at?

  One Response to “Fine The Perpetrator, not the Organisation”

  1. It’s a pity the TV bosses aren’t being hauled up in the same way as the four British Airways bosses as seen here:
    BA bosses in price-fixing charge.
    One guy, Mr George, said that the allegations were “unfounded”.
    I find this hard to reconcile with the fact that his company BA, of which he was Commercial Director, pleaded guilty to all charges in the US after which it was finally fined $300 million.
    The BBC guys should take note. This is what I’m hammering on about. The only way to make corporations accountable is to chase the salaried staff and dividended directors making the dodgy decisions.
    After all, it is people who make the decisions, not companies.
    It should be people who carry the can for criminality – after all, they are the ones that benefit from the wrongdoings.

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